Country Overview

China is a truly unique country. It is really rich in culture and history with extremely friendly people, eager to embrace new visitors.

While many parts of China could be mistaken as somewhere western, such as parts of the big cities of Beijing, Shanghai, Shenzhen and Guangzhou, China, not surprisingly, is still very ‘Chinese’.

Cost of Living for Teachers in China

Teaching in China is a great way to build up your savings. The cost of living is incredibly low, and although salaries may not be as high for TEFL teachers as they are in some other countries, you’ll find yourself saving a significant amount each month. However, Chinese money can seem a little confusing at first. The Chinese currency is called ‘Renminbi’ or ‘Yuan’ (abbreviated to RMB, and sometimes given the same symbol as the Japanese Yen). Typically, though, people don’t use those words. They say ‘kuai’. One kuai is made up of ten ‘jiao’, which are also called ‘mao’. A mao is made up of ten ‘fen’.

Sound complicated? It’s not, really. For a start, nobody uses fen anymore. In fact, fen are becoming collectors’ items. The different terms for yuan and jiao are simply colloquialisms. Renminbi is equivalent to ‘United States Dollar’ or ‘British Pound Sterling’. It’s not something we commonly say. Likewise, we don’t always say ‘pound’ or ‘dollar’, either. And so the Chinese don’t always say ‘yuan’ or ‘jiao’. They use ‘kuai’ and ‘mao’ like we use ‘quid’ and ‘buck’.

Prices are ridiculously cheap by Western standards, and so a beer from a convenience store will typically cost between 2-5RMB (much less than a dollar). A plate of fried rice is usually 5-7RMB. A bottle of water costs about 1.5RMB.

When you pay for things in a store, don’t always expect there to be a price tag, and so it’s worthwhile learning the numbers. If you can’t remember the numbers, you could try learning the hand signals – Chinese people use their fingers differently for counting than we’re accustomed to in the West. Most importantly, learn to haggle! Everything in China is negotiable, so don’t be afraid to ask for a deal, if you can correctly say the numbers.

Top Locations to Teach in China

Many of the large cities in China, such as Beijing, Shanghai, Shenzhen and Guangzhou, (hyperlink each to our Cities page or directly to each city page?) are diverse and metropolitan in nature. The pace of living is fast so you should expect lots of pedestrians, traffic and hustle and bustle. There is a real energy to these places. For example, Shanghai is often compared to New York, thanks to its international feel and great nightlife. Beijing, on the other hand, is just a bit more relaxed and has more tourists but both offer an amazing living experience.

For the average Chinese person, city life consists of a typically long work day of up to 12 hours. For relaxation, they enjoy shopping and the ever-popular ‘karaoke’. More and more people from rural areas are moving to the cities, and approximately 20 million Chinese move to urban areas each year. Chinese cities are an ever-changing phenomenon with some streets becoming unrecognisable in the space of just 6 months.

There are over 650 cities in China, and more than 100 of them have a population exceeding 1 million people. These cities tend to have all the typical amenities that a city would have in your home country including several universities, hospitals, big wide roads, an airport and various types of housing.

To learn more about some of the larger cities, check out https://teachola.com/cities/ for some fun facts and cost of living info specific to each city.

Many people describe their time in China as a defining experience in their life as you’ll not only learn a lot about life over here but you’ll end up learning a lot about yourself too.

Apart from the practical reasons, teaching English in China also provides a great opportunity for any recent graduates (or those with any type of debt!) to pay off student loans or to save some money. Not only will you have the opportunity to reduce or eliminate your debt, you’ll also be able to save. You’ll experience an amazing new culture and gain valuable work experience while being paid. It’s also a great place to save some money for future travels with many of our China-based teachers taking advantage of their long, paid holiday time to travel around Asia in between terms. China is a fantastic country to live in, beyond the interesting sites and low cost of living, it is the Chinese people that really make living in China such a wonderful and memorable experience!

Teaching Jobs in China

China is a huge country, with something to suit every taste. If you’re a fan of big cities with international restaurants and massive shopping malls, you have Beijing, Shanghai, Shenzhen, Guangzhou (hyperlink each one to the relevant page?) and many of the developed medium-sized cities with truly international reputations.

These days, there are few places on earth where it’s easier to save money than China. Salaries for teaching English in China dwarf the average local salary, and with teacher salaries on the rise, it is possible to save more than you could in other locations. International School teachers can expect a very handsome salary and benefits package, comparable and in some cases better than other popular locations in Asia.

This ancient country may have been slow to open up to the West, but now that it has, it’s quickly gaining a reputation as a comfortable, exciting, modern, fun and profitable place to live.

Teach at Private language schools in China

Here at Teachola, we have carefully built up a selection of quality partner schools in all of the major cities across China. From fascinating Beijing in the north and sparkling Shanghai in the East, to sunny Shenzhen and Guangzhou in the south – the choice of locations is wide and varied.

We make a point of sending one of our team to visit every school before we decide to work with them or not. We check out the accommodation provided and speak with the current teachers there to get a good overall opinion of how the whole academy is run. This strategy has really helped us build up strong trusted relationships with the top ESL schools across China which we have hand-picked very carefully since our first ever placement in China way back in 2010.

Our management team has weekly meetings with management at these partner schools to ensure close and efficient management of our teachers and to further build our trusted relationships with these professional organisations. It also allows us to provide our teachers with feedback on how they are progressing through the duration of their contract, something which our teachers have always appreciated.

Teachers in the private schools that we work with normally earn more than in universities or government-operated high schools and can expect to work 20-30 hours per week. It can be a very satisfying role especially if you enjoy teaching children. And with the smaller sized classes, you get to know each individual student more easily and observe them improve over the course of the term. For more information on salary and benefits available for these particular roles, check out our wide selection of TEFL teaching jobs in many popular cities across China coming up over the coming months on our jobs page www.teachola.com/find-a-job/.

Teach at Public Schools in China

Teachola works with several Public School programs in various parts of China. As we manage things very closely, these programs have proven very popular and have been a real success for us. With positions at public schools in Suzhou, Shanghai, and Shenzhen, to name but a few, we usually hire twice a year for these highly sought after roles.

These positions can be compared to the EPIK positions we recruit for in South Korea. Working 5 days per week, Monday to Friday, and with standard public school hours (8:30 am–4:30 pm), you certainly won’t be overworked. Benefits are good with the cost of flights and apartment rental covered for the duration of your contract. Class sizes are generally larger than the equivalent in our Private Academy partner schools but you will have the support of a Chinese assistant teacher to help you manage the class along with ongoing training and great orientation and training back when you first arrive. Generally, Chinese kids don’t require much discipline, they are usually eager and really interested in learning. Like any children, they love to end a class with a lively game of some sort.

Check out our wide selection of Public School TEFL jobs in various locations around China coming up this season on our Jobs Board. www.teachola.com/find-a-job/

Teach at International Schools in China

Teachola works with a wide selection of top International Schools across China. We hire for all subject areas ranging from Math and the Sciences to PE, English Literature, Art, and Music, with everything in between. Many of our client schools use the popular IB curriculum and the British IGCSE set up, as well as the US AP curriculum. The majority of our client schools are located in the top tier cities across China.

For teaching jobs in international schools in China, candidates must hold a professional Teacher Qualification and have previous relevant teaching experience. Benefits in these schools are excellent with competitive salaries, professional training, accommodation, and flights covered, long paid vacations along with many other benefits. The classroom dynamic is excellent as students at the schools are usually very focused and keen to prepare for entrance exams into the top Universities in Europe and the US. Check out our wide selection of subject teaching roles coming up this season in many cities across China on our Jobs Board, www.teachola.com/find-a-job/

Requirements to Teach in China

The basic requirements to teach English in China (TEFL jobs) are a Bachelor’s degree and a TEFL certificate.  A 120-hour TEFL or TESOL is the standard and covers requirements across all schools/regions). Some schools will also require some teaching experience (this will be specified when you apply).

How To Apply

If you’re still at home, getting your visa is probably your priority and the process takes a bit of time and effort (depending on which country you will be employed in of course).

We will advise you on every step and make it as stress-free as possible. Suffice to say, once it’s done and you’re here, you’ll wonder what you fretted about. It goes without saying that if you have any questions, please email us using our Contact us form on this site or directly through info@teachola.com.

So, what exactly is a teaching Visa?

This is what you will need to legally teach in Asia. It is usually valid for 12 months (the length of a standard contract) from the date of entry into the country and of course, it’s renewable.

In order to be eligible for this visa, teachers must hold a minimum of a Bachelor’s Degree (either 3 or 4 years) from an accredited University and be a citizen of one of the following English-speaking countries – USA, Canada, Ireland, UK, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa.

Your visa will only allow you to work at the specific school which sponsors your visa. You cannot work at another school unless you receive special permission from immigration on your visa. When you receive your visa, it may be a single-entry visa. If you wish to travel internationally from your base country in Asia, as many teachers do, you will need to apply for a multiple re-entry visa at the immigration office. This is very easy to obtain and usually doesn’t cost a lot.

Situated in South-East Asia and bordering Thailand, Singapore and Indonesia, Malaysia is a nation with a diverse culture, rich in natural beauty and an abundance of wildlife.

Malaysia is comprised of two parts, the Malay Peninsula in the West and East Malaysia, made up by Saba and Sarawak states, situated on Borneo Island.

There are approximately 28 million people living in Malaysia, the majority of whom reside on peninsular West Malaysia. The capital city Kuala Lumpur (KL) is home to roughly seven million people. Away from the hustle and bustle of the cities, you’ll find stunning coastal plains leading to green hills, breathtaking mountains and some truly beautiful stretches of beach and coastline.

The population of Malaysia is made up of ethnic Malays, Chinese and Indians, along with expatriates from surrounding nations such as Thailand, Vietnam, the Philippines and Indonesia. There is also a sizeable influx of expatriates from Europe, North America and Australasia that gives parts of KL a western feel, while also experiencing South East Asia.

Teaching in Malaysia

Teaching in Malaysia is an exciting and interesting choice. It is a country that is very friendly, laid back and never dull. Things move at a pace that most of us would regard as relaxed. With favourable pay, holiday allowance and public holidays, teachers tend to enjoy a very comfortable standard of living.

The cost of living can vary greatly depending on your lifestyle. Where you choose to live, eat and socialise can have a big impact on your ability to save money. The minimum wage in Malaysia is RM900 ($300) a month. While no one expects you to be as thrifty as the locals, this gives an indication of how cheap the cost of living can be.

International School Jobs in Kuala Lumpur

Teachola works with a wide selection of top International Schools located in KL. We hire for all subject areas ranging from Maths and the Sciences, to PE, English Literature and Art, with everything in between. Many of our client schools teach through both the popular IB curriculum and the British IGCSE set up.

Candidates must hold a professional Teacher Qualification and have previous relevant teaching experience, ideally more than two years teaching your chosen subject. Benefits in these schools are excellent with competitive salaries, professional training, accommodation and flights covered, long paid vacations along with many other benefits. The classroom dynamic is excellent as students at these schools are usually very focused and keen to prepare for entrance exams into the top Universities in Europe and US.

We have a support team on the ground in Malaysia who regularly visit our schools to ensure quality but this has never been an issue as the schools are very professional. You can check out our wide selection of subject teaching roles at these top tier schools in Malaysia coming up this year on our Jobs Board https://teachola.com/find-a-job/ .

Living in Kuala Lumpur

Living and teaching in Kuala Lumpur (KL) is the experience of a lifetime. Whilst the city may seem impenetrable at times due to constant clutter, construction, noise and traffic, scratch beneath the surface and you’ll discover a plethora of fun things to fill your weekends and evenings.

Sight-seeing

Top (literally) of the list has to be the Petronas Towers – once the tallest in the world, this 88-story building is perhaps the most iconic building in Malaysia. Its twin towers are awesome and a sight to behold. At the base of the building you can find KLCC Mall and park, which are famous shopping and recreation centres. KL Bird Park and Butterfly Park are close to each other and make up an afternoon well spent.

Chinatown is one of the most popular tourist spots in KL and is where backpackers tend to hang out in KL. Based in and around Petaling Street, it is immersed in oriental culture and history and you can find all the best Chinese dishes here, 24 hours a day. At night there’s a lively market filled with stalls offering all kinds of knick-knacks and impostor items at rock bottom prices. The Little India enclave along Jalan Tengku Kelana, Klang is the biggest Indian street in Malaysia and an afternoon or evening here is quite an experience with loud Bollywood music, Tamil chatter, street stalls, colourful saris, banana leaf stalls, and ornate jewellery shops.

The highland resort Fraser’s Hill, nestled among the mountains is popular for its nature activities and its cool climate and has picturesque cycling and walking trails. Batu Caves, a Hindu temple, dedicated to Lord Murugan, is one of the best-known tourist attractions in Kuala Lumpur. Located about 10 km north of the city, the shrine is known for its giant golden statue and the almost 300 steps to the top. Be careful of the monkeys, though – they are not shy and tend to grab food items from guests!

Shopping

KL is packed with shopping malls. Malaysians take retail very seriously, with a lot of the malls looking like futuristic, elaborate complexes with a variety of themes. You can shop, watch movies, go ice-skating, eat international cuisine and even sing karaoke in a Kuala Lumpur mall. If you are looking for something less hectic and with a more local flavour, head to Bangsar Village I & II. These twin malls offer upmarket fashions, quirky gift shops and feature some beautiful clothing from fantastic local designers.

Food and Drink

Marini’s on 57 has one of the best views in Kuala Lumpur and deserves a separate mention. Wonderfully situated on the 57th floor of the “Third Tower” the bar and restaurant has awe inspiring views of The Petronas and is known for its delicious Italian cuisine. It’s a little on the pricey side by KL standards so maybe save it for a special occasion.

Jalan Alor, just north of Bukit Bintang, is KL’s biggest collection of roadside restaurants and a unique food destination in the heart of the city. During the day it’s relatively quiet, but when the sun goes down, the street transforms into a continuous open-air restaurant where you can sample pretty much every South East Asian dish you can think of.

If you are teaching in KL and missing your food favourites from home or are looking for organic, upmarket brands, head to one of the three B.I.G.’s (Ben’s The Grocer) located around the city. This supermarket is an expat’s dream. Along with getting your shopping done, you can eat samples galore, watch live cooking demonstrations, attend themed shopping nights and even attend cooking classes. Ben’s also contains a butcher’s, bakery, oyster bar, deli, greengrocer, chocolatier, florist, coffee roaster and organic section.

Of all the Asian countries, South Korea is one of the best to teach English in, as foreigners are really given a warm welcome here.

Apart from living in one of the most naturally beautiful countries in the East, teaching in South Korea can offer you many extras. You will also have the respect of the local people and you can join a growing community of English teachers throughout South Korea.

Teaching English in Korea is big business and can take many forms. However, here is a rundown of the kinds of job you are most likely to find yourself in. Big business means there is a lot of money invested in teaching and wherever there is a lot of money, there are cowboys trying to rake it in and hold on to it. It cannot be stressed enough that people looking for work must go through a reputable recruiter to find safe and secure work in a legitimate school. Insist on speaking to other foreigners in your proposed school or getting their email address which affords more privacy. Too many people have had bad experiences here because they simply did not bother.

Korean parents are very passionate about their children’s education; they will fork out large percentages of the household budget to send their children to private academies where they can learn useful skills, English of course, being at the top of the list. As a result, you will find them very demanding of their children. But the teachers are left to run their classes as they see fit. Teaching is a respected profession and the teacher’s judgement is deferred to; the parents reckon that because you’re a teacher you know what’s best. So, although you’ll feel bad for the overworked students, the parents will trust in you and leave you alone.

Generally speaking, you will find teaching here stress-free. Yes, you will be nervous at first and taking on a new job just after arriving in a new country is a bit of a double whammy. It will be tough but will gradually get better and it is likely you will surprise yourself by your adaptability. You will, in fact, learn something about yourself.

It is in any good school’s interests to make it easier for you to cope and to fit in. You should know your spelling, but unless you are teaching at university senior level, you won’t have to delve too much into grammar; hopefully you know it but you won’t have to teach or explain it. You will follow a textbook and general syllabus. Supplementary materials and everything you need will be provided. Your colleagues will give you tips and there are reams of advice and hints on the internet. Compared to at home, your teaching is not very regulated. You will be given some fairly vague guidelines regarding your methods and discipline procedures but they follow the dictums of common sense. Your employer will more than likely observe a class or two at the beginning to offer advice and perhaps occasionally later, but in your classroom you’re the boss and left to your own devices and methods. There is very little paperwork and time spent with homework and prep is minimal.

Private English Language Academy Jobs in South Korea

Most expats looking to teach English in Korea will work, initially at least, in a hagwon (Korean word for private academy). These are private schools generally for children up to the age of 12. An average working day for a teacher at one of these hagwons does vary from academy to academy, but a typical day starts around 10am and will finish early evening with breaks and free lunch. However, there are also private academies where you will teach from the afternoon into the evening. Your students will be varied; school kids who need extra tuition or adults taking it upon themselves to learn the language. The holidays are reasonable and the hours good if you are a night bird, but conditions and wages vary too much to summarise them here. Best advice is read your contract carefully!

If you’re teaching kindergarten level, you may find that your first day at school is also the first day for your 5 year-old pupils, so expect the unexpected. Your classes may appear to be chaotic at first – probably because they are, but don’t worry, it has happened to us all and things settle down. The classes are small – typically 10-12 kids and no more than 15. As well as basic English, depending on the hagwon, you may find yourself teaching some art or performing some science experiments and will probably get out of the classroom to go on day-trips to local museums or parks. Games and fun activities are encouraged. The kids are invariably adorable and often hilarious – even when they don’t mean to be. It’s almost a guarantee that you will get very attached to your students!

Public School Jobs in South Korea

Public School teaching offers quite a different teaching experience from that of a hagwon teacher. The three types of Public School teaching jobs are at Elementary, Middle and High School level. They will invariably have bigger class sizes but you’ll work less hours, get more holidays and probably better wages. There may be up to 40 pupils in your class (this can vary), with teenage hormones everywhere, but discipline isn’t a huge issue.

If you’re nervous about this kind of teaching, don’t worry too much. For each class your Korean co-teacher is there to help out and explain tricky or important stuff to the students. In fact, while it is reassuring to have a co-teacher, particularly at first, few teachers have much use for them once they have settled in. Second level is the hard part for Korean students as their overriding concern is getting into the best university where they can then network and thereby have beneficial friends for later life. All this means they have too much to lose by misbehaving here and causing you unnecessary problems, so don’t stress about that side of things too much.

Requirements for Teaching in South Korea

For teaching English in South Korea, you will require a Bachelor’s degree. For private academies, unlike other countries, a TEFL certificate (while an advantage), is often not a requirement for a TEFL job. However, for public school positions with the EPIK (English Program in Korea), a TEFL certificate will be required unless you have a teaching certificate, a degree in English (or related major) or previous teaching experience (a full year or more) in Korea.

Thailand is world-famous for its beautiful, long sandy beaches and thanks to its warm climate, they can be enjoyed at any time of the year.

With its central location in Asia (it has land borders with Laos, Cambodia, and Malaysia), Thailand is a great hub for exploring other countries with relative ease and at very low cost.

Thailand is a culturally rich nation; there are a vast number of temples and historical sites dotted all around the country, so your free time has endless possibilities for places to go and things to do!

The capital, Bangkok, is a popular city with a population of over ten million. The city has experienced phenomenal growth over the past 30 years to become one of the leading economic cities in Asia. It has such a high influx of tourists that it makes the city a mecca for cheap flights to and from there. The city has easily the best street food in the world. With such rich flavours at cheap prices on every street, you will be spoilt for choice at every meal.

The Thai people, with their strong Buddhist values, are a very relaxed and friendly people and really add to the experience of living and working in Thailand.

Teaching in Thailand

Immigration laws change frequently but in general, a prospective teacher doesn’t need to jump through many hoops to gain employment. For our high-end international schools, teachers require professional teaching certification along with two or more years of classroom experience teaching in their chosen subject. Whereas typically ESL teachers are required to possess at least a Bachelor’s degree and to come from a country where English is the native language.

International School Jobs in Thailand

Teachola works with a wide selection of top International Schools located in Thailand. We hire for all subject areas ranging from Math and the Sciences, to PE, English Literature and Music, with everything in between.

Candidates must hold a professional teacher qualification and have previous relevant teaching experience, ideally more than two years teaching your chosen subject. Remuneration in these schools are excellent with competitive salaries, professional training, accommodation and flights covered, long paid vacations along with many other benefits.

The classroom dynamic is excellent as students at these schools are usually very focused and keen to prepare for entrance exams into the top Universities in Europe and US. Check out our wide selection of subject teaching roles at these top tier schools in Thailand coming up this year on our jobs page, https://teachola.com/find-a-job/ .

Public School Jobs in Thailand

If you are teaching English in a public school in Thailand, you will be typically working 5 days per week, Monday to Friday, with standard public school hours (8:30am – 4:30pm), so you certainly won’t be overworked. Benefits are quite standard and class sizes are generally larger than the equivalent in Private Academy partner schools, but you will have the support of a Thai assistant teacher to help you manage the class along with on-going training and great orientation and training when you arrive. Generally, Thai kids don’t require much discipline, they are usually eager and really interested in learning and, like Western kids, they love to end a class with a lively game of some sort.

Check out our ESL Public School teaching roles in Thailand coming up this season on our jobs page, https://teachola.com/find-a-job/.

Vietnam is a spectacular country with a long history and ancient traditions. It has a plethora of historic attractions and old temples.

If you’re looking for amazing beaches, cheap and delicious food and lots of cultural sights, then Vietnam is the place to go!

Many choose to teach English in Vietnam because of the country’s wonderful natural beauty; the green rice fields in the north, or the fascinating bustle of the Mekong Delta in the south. Teachola has been placing teachers into Vietnam now for several the years and it always seems to be a highly sought-after location for teaching in Asia. Due to the huge tourism industry, travelling in Vietnam is not difficult. In fact, around the main tourist attractions, it is extremely easy to find transportation from one destination to the next.

Over the past few decades, Vietnam, like many other Southeast Asian countries, has enjoyed a booming tourism industry, with millions of visitors from around the globe visiting the country’s pristine beaches and mysterious mountains. Now that it is possible to live and work in Vietnam teaching English, many teachers have the opportunity to explore one of the world’s most fascinating and beautiful nations with great ease.

Teaching in Vietnam

If you’re teaching in Vietnam, you will most likely be teaching in a city, rather than out in the countryside. This means you’ll have access to the country’s transportation network. Obviously, the bigger the city, the better the connections. If you’re in Hanoi, you’ll be able to see the north of the country comparatively quickly. If you’re in Ho Chi Minh, you’ll be able to get around the south of the country with greater ease. Da Nang, which is about halfway between the two cities, offers you the best chance to see the central area of the country.

Requirements for Teaching in Vietnam

For high-end International Schools, teachers require a professional teaching certification along with 2 or more years of classroom experience teaching in their chosen subject. Whereas TEFL teachers are typically required to hold at least a Bachelor’s degree and a CELTA (or equivalent in-classroom TEFL) and have English as their native language.

International School Jobs in Vietnam

Teachola works with a wide selection of top International Schools located in Vietnam, with the majority of our partner schools located in Ho Chi Minh City. We hire for all subject areas ranging from Math and the Sciences, to PE, English Literature and Music, with everything in between. Many of our client schools teach through both the popular IB curriculum and the British IGCSE set up.
Candidates must hold a professional Teacher Qualification and have previous relevant teaching experience, ideally more than 2 years teaching your chosen subject. Benefits in these schools are excellent with competitive salaries, professional training, accommodation and flights covered, long paid vacations along with many other benefits. Students at these schools are usually very focussed and keen to prepare for entrance exams into the top Universities in Europe and US. Check out our wide selection of subject teaching roles at these top- tier schools in Vietnam coming up this year on our Jobs Board, https://teachola.com/find-a-job/.

Teaching in Ho Chi Minh City

Ho Chi Minh City or Saigon, as it used to be called, is famous for its charm, chaos, coffee, pho, traffic and, of course, motorbikes. Many travelers might be shocked the first time they visit Vietnam’s frenetic biggest city, with most wondering if they are taking their lives in their hands by the simple task of crossing the road! Yet Ho Chi Minh City is beloved by residents as a place of surprising calm and by travelers for its amazing offerings, diverse style and its incredible food. The crazy roads are actually all part of its charm.

Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC) is where we work with most schools. This popular city with a population of over ten million has experienced phenomenal growth over the past thirty years to become one of the leading economic cities in Asia. It has such a high influx of tourists that it makes the city a mecca for cheap flights to and from there.

The majority of our teaching positions in Vietnam are with top tier International Schools in Ho Chi Minh City where we have been placing teachers with great success over the past few years. We do also work with a small number of carefully selected ESL Private language Academies but our main focus here is with professionally qualified teachers. We have a support team on the ground in HCMC who regularly visit our schools to ensure quality but this has never been an issue as the schools are very professional.

Melting Pot of Cultures

Ho Chi Minh City is a wonderful blend of Chinese, colonial and modern influences. Being the centre of Vietnam’s economic and cultural activity, it is the best city in the country to start any Vietnamese adventure. You’ll be pleased to hear that filling your time in HCMC is easy, given the vast amount of things to do! Let us help you narrow them down to get the most of out a stay there.

Attractions and Amenities

To get a real understanding of the city, jump on an organised tour bike. Exploring the streets from the back seat of one of the city’s 5 million bikes is an exhilarating way to get a feel for a city. Another top attraction is the war museum. It’s not for the faint-hearted as the War Remnants Museum documents the brutality of the Vietnam War in minute detail. It is one of the most visited museums in the country, attracting more than half a million visitors a year and is an essential part of any Vietnam travel itinerary.

Food and Drink

Tasting the pho is a must-do for any visitor or foreigner teaching English in Vietnam! This Vietnamese staple noodle dish can be found on almost every street corner in every district of

the city. You can eat it inside in the cool of the air-con or right out on the street as the locals do. It’s up to you and depends entirely on how adventurous you’re feeling.

Anyone teaching in Vietnam has to try the local coffee! You might be surprised to hear that Vietnam is the biggest coffee exporter in the world, and it’s not difficult to see why. Vietnamese coffee is fantastic; it’s not expensive and it’s available nearly everywhere. You can pick up a Vietnamese coffee in pretty much every restaurant or café in HCMC. When served white, it’s made with condensed milk, creating a drink of the gods that mixes the strength of the drip filter coffee with a sweet, delicious finish. You could also try the black coffee. Black coffee with ice is strong and sweet and has an almost chocolate-like richness. Be warned though – they are addictive; you won’t be able to stop or sleep afterwards!

Shopping

Another experience not to be missed is shopping in Ho Chi Minh City, which boasts some amazing value shopping opportunities for bespoke clothing, woodwork, random bric-a-brac, scarves, t-shirts, jewelry and even some pretty decent art if you are in the market for some. Of all the markets, Ben Thanh is the most popular and perhaps the best place to put your bargaining skills to good use .It is especially popular in the evening and at night, when food vendors set up stalls and locals and tourists alike flock to eat. Trust us, it’s an experience not to be missed!

Singapore is a fascinating place. The population is made up of ethnic Chinese, Malays and Indians, along with expatriates from surrounding nations such as Thailand, Vietnam, The Philippines and Indonesia.

There are also many expatriates from Europe, America, Australia, New Zealand, the Middle East and Africa. This mix has a strong bearing on life and culture in Singapore. Not too many countries in the world have such an interesting and harmonious ethnic mix.

Teaching in Singapore

Teaching in Singapore can be a very satisfying and rewarding career move and a very enjoyable way to live. With favourable pay, holiday allowance and public holidays, our teachers enjoy a very comfortable standard of living in progressive and forward-thinking schools. The schooling system in Singapore is certainly one of the best and most highly regulated in Asia.

International School Jobs in Singapore

Teachola works with a wide selection of top International Schools located in Singapore. We hire for all subject areas ranging from English Literature, History and Art to Maths and the Sciences, with everything in between.

Candidates must hold a professional teacher qualification and have previous relevant teaching experience, ideally more than 2 years teaching your chosen subject. Benefits in these schools are excellent with competitive salaries, professional training, accommodation and flights covered, long paid vacations along with many other benefits. The classroom dynamic is excellent as students at these schools are usually very focused and keen to prepare for entrance exams into the top Universities in Europe and US. We have a support team on the ground in Singapore who regularly visit our schools to ensure quality but this has never been an issue as the schools are very professional.

You can check out our wide selection of subject teaching roles at these top tier schools in Singapore coming up this year on our Jobs page, https://teachola.com/find-a-job/ .

How To Apply

You can check out our wide selection of subject teaching roles at these top tier schools in Singapore coming up this year on our Jobs page, www.teachola.com/find-a-job/ .